10 what are the 3 types of roux Ideas

Below is information and knowledge on the topic what are the 3 types of roux gather and compiled by the monanngon.net team. Along with other related topics like: 4 types of roux, Brown roux, White roux, How many different types of roux are there, What is roux used for, What Is white roux used for, What is brown roux used for.


Types of Roux

Roux

Definition of Roux

Roux (“roo”) is a thickening agent made from fat and flour. It is used in production of sauces, gravies, stews and soups for getting the desired consistency. Equal part of fat and flour (1:1) is cooked over flame to get the required color and doneness. Depending upon the color, cooking time and doneness, roux can be classified into three types and that are-

3 Stages of a Roux

  • White Roux- A white roux retains its initial color and is only cooked slightly to remove any starchiness from the roux.
  • Blond Roux- A blonde roux is caramelized slightly to give it a darker blonde color.
  • Brown Roux– A brown roux is cooked until almost burnt and highly caramelized, it also has a nice nutty flavor to it.

1)     White Roux- The mixture of the fat and flour is cooked just for 2-3 minutes on medium flame, the raw flavor of the flour is just cooked out while maintaining the white color of the mixture and without developing any toasted aroma. This roux is used in white sauce preparation such as béchamel because of the color. All milk based sauces are made with white roux.

2)     Blond or Blonde Roux- Also called as yellow roux or golden roux. Blonde roux is cooked for 3-5 minutes, thus caramelizing it and giving it a dark blonde color. This roux is used in making of veloute and other sauces which require golden texture. This is the most common roux used in culinary preparations because of its balanced flavor and taste also blond roux has excellent thickening power in comparison to brown roux.

3)     Brown Roux- This roux is cooked for 8-10 minutes until the mixtures develops dark brown nutty color which has more pronounced and sharper aroma. The thickening power of brown roux is less because of the cooked flour and hence the quantity required is more in sauce making. This roux is used in brown sauce preparation such has espagnole and other brown gravies.

Types of Fat Used in Making of Roux 

There are many option of fat in roux making such as clarified butter, margarines, vegetable oil and shortenings and animal fat. The use of these options depends upon the requirement of taste, aroma and texture of the sauce or gravy preparation. Below is the description of the taste and other effect on the roux of these options.

  • Clarified butter is preferred for the finest sauces because of its flavor. The butter is clarified because the moisture content of whole butter tends to gelatinize some of the starch and makes the roux hard to work.
  • Margarine is widely used in place of butter because of its lower cost. However, its flavor is inferior to butter, so it does not make as fine a sauce. The quality of margarine varies from brand to brand.
  • Animal fats, such as chicken fat, beef drippings, and lard are used when their flavor is appropriate to the sauce. Thus, chicken fat can be used for chicken velouté, and beef drippings can be used for beef gravy. When properly used, animal fats can enhance the flavor of a sauce.
  • Vegetable oil and shortening can be used for roux but, because they add no flavor, they are not preferred. Solid shortening also has the disadvantage of having a high melting point, which gives it an unpleasant fuzzy feeling in the mouth. It is best reserved for the bakeshop and the fry kettle.

Flour Used in Making of Roux

  • The thickening power of flour depends, in part, on its starch content. Bread flour has less starch and more protein than cake flour.
  • Eight parts (such as ounces or grams) of cake flour has the same thickening power as 10 parts of bread flour.
  • Bread flour frequently is used for general cooking purposes in commercial kitchens even though it has less thickening power than cake flour or pastry flour.
  • Most sauce recipes are based on bread flour or on all-purpose flour, which has similar thickening power. The proportions of roux to liquid must be adjusted if another flour is used.
  • Flour is sometimes browned dry in the oven for use in brown roux. A heavily browned flour has only one-third the thickening power of un-browned flour.
  • In addition to starch, wheat flour contains proteins and other components. As a roux thickened sauce is simmered, these components rise to the surface as Scum, which then can be skimmed off.
  • Sauces are generally simmered for a time even after the starch is completely gelatinized so these “impurities” can be cooked off. This improves the texture, gloss, and clarity of a sauce.
  • When a high-protein flour such as bread flour is used in a roux, the sauce must be cooked longer and skimmed more often to achieve good clarity.
  • Sauces made with wheat flour do not freeze well because some of the starch breaks down when frozen, reducing its thickening power.

Ratio of Fat and Flour in Roux preparation

  • Correct amounts of fat and flour i.e. equal parts by weight are important to a good roux.
  • There must be enough fat to coat all the starch granules, but not too much.
  • In fact, Escoffier called for even less fat than our standard proportions (8 parts fat to 9 parts flour).
  • A good roux is stiff, not runny or pourable. A roux with too much fat is called a Slack Roux.
  • Excess fat increases the cost of the roux unnecessarily, the excess fat rises to the top of the sauce, where it either is skimmed off or makes the sauce look greasy.
  • Too much flour will result in a starchy taste and too much oil will cause a Slick on the top of the sauce.

Roux used for clarifying of Sauce

In addition to starch, wheat flour contains proteins and other components. As a roux thickened sauce is simmered, these components rise to the surface as scum. They then can be skimmed off.

Sauces are generally simmered for a time even after the starch is completely gelatinized so these “impurities” can be cooked off. This improves the texture, gloss, and clarity of a sauce.

When a high-protein flour such as bread flour is used in a roux, the sauce must be cooked longer and skimmed more often to achieve good clarity.

Health issues with Roux prepared Sauce.

Today, roux-thickened sauces are often condemned for health reasons because of the fat content of the roux. It should be remembered, however, that when a roux-bound velouté or brown sauce is properly made, most of the fat is released and skimmed off before the sauce is served. Sauces made with wheat flour do not freeze well because some of the starch breaks down when frozen, reducing its thickening power.

Precautions in Roux preparation

Correct amounts of fat and flour i.e. equal parts by weight are important to a good roux. There must be enough fat to coat all the starch granules, but not too much. In fact, Escoffier called for even less fat than our standard proportions (8 parts fat to 9 parts flour). A good roux is stiff, not runny or pourable. A roux with too much fat is called a “Slack Roux”. Excess fat increases the cost of the roux unnecessarily; the excess fat rises to the top of the sauce, where it either is skimmed off or makes the sauce look greasy.

Cretan Staka or Staka Roux

Staka is a type of roux particular to Cretan cuisine. It is prepared by cooking goat milk cream over a low flame with wheat flour or barley flour, the protein-rich part of the butterfat coagulates with the flour or starch and forms the staka, which is served hot as dipping sauce or over French fries. Although it is a type of roux but is not used as thickening Agent.

The fatty cream part is skimmed and refrigerated, once sufficient quantity is collected, it is left under the sun for 5-6 days to form butter known as stakovoutyro or staka butter or “Sun Kissed Butter”, which is kept for later use and has a faint cheesy flavor.

A touch of it adds flavor and richness in rice, pasta dishes and cookies. Rice- pilaf, one of the glories of Chania’s cookery, is stirred with hot stakovoutyro before serving. (Source : History of Greek Food)

To know more about thickeners and binders please read the following topic “Types of Thickening Agent”.

Extra Information About what are the 3 types of roux That You May Find Interested

If the information we provide above is not enough, you may find more below here.

Types of Roux – Shivesh's Kitchen

Types of Roux - Shivesh's Kitchen

  • Author: shiveshskitchen.com

  • Rating: 5⭐ (189091 rating)

  • Highest Rate: 5⭐

  • Lowest Rate: 2⭐

  • Sumary: Roux is a thickening agent made from fat and flour. It is used in production of sauces, gravies, stews and soups for getting the desired consistency.

  • Matching Result: Roux is a thickening agent made from fat and flour. It is used in production of sauces, gravies, stews and soups for getting the desired consistency.

  • Intro: Types of Roux Definition of Roux Roux (“roo”) is a thickening agent made from fat and flour. It is used in production of sauces, gravies, stews and soups for getting the desired consistency. Equal part of fat and flour (1:1) is cooked over flame to get the required color and…
  • Source: https://www.shiveshskitchen.com/2016/08/roux.html

The Mother Sauces, The Prequel: Three Types of Roux

The Mother Sauces, The Prequel: Three Types of Roux

  • Author: gravyseason.com

  • Rating: 5⭐ (189091 rating)

  • Highest Rate: 5⭐

  • Lowest Rate: 2⭐

  • Sumary: The five mother sauces form the basis for all sauces of classical cuisine. In this series, you will learn how to cook up each one: béchamel, velouté, espagnole, hollandaise, and tomato. But before you dive into these awesomesauces, we need to take a step back and cover the basics:…

  • Matching Result: Roux is a cooked mixture of fat and flour used to thicken sauces, soups, and stews. There are three main types of roux. White roux, commonly …

  • Intro: The Mother Sauces, The Prequel: Three Types of Roux The five mother sauces form the basis for all sauces of classical cuisine. In this series, you will learn how to cook up each one: béchamel, velouté, espagnole, hollandaise, and tomato. But before you dive into these awesomesauces, we need to…
  • Source: https://gravyseason.com/blogs/gravy-season-blog/the-mother-sauces-part-1-three-types-of-roux

Roux – Wikipedia

Roux - Wikipedia

  • Author: en.wikipedia.org

  • Rating: 5⭐ (189091 rating)

  • Highest Rate: 5⭐

  • Lowest Rate: 2⭐

  • Sumary:

  • Matching Result: Roux is typically made from equal parts of flour and fat by weight. … The flour is added to the melted fat or oil on the stove top, blended until smooth, and …

  • Intro: Roux A dark roux in development Roux () is a mixture of flour and fat cooked together and used to thicken sauces.[1] Roux is typically made from equal parts of flour and fat by weight.[2] The flour is added to the melted fat or oil on the stove top, blended…
  • Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roux

What are the 3 types of roux? – The Healthy Journal

What are the 3 types of roux? - The Healthy Journal

  • Author: thehealthyjournal.com

  • Rating: 5⭐ (189091 rating)

  • Highest Rate: 5⭐

  • Lowest Rate: 2⭐

  • Sumary: The Healthy Journal is a lifestyle website with gluten, dairy, sugar free recipes, interviews , health articles, natural remedies, food stores and vegetarian restaurants worldwide.

  • Matching Result: There are four varieties of roux: white, blond, brown, and dark brown. The different colors are a result of how long the roux is cooked; white is cooked …

  • Intro: The Healthy Journal – Gluten, Dairy, Sugar Free Recipes, Interviews and Health Articles What are the 3 types of roux? There are four varieties of roux: white, blond, brown, and dark brown. The different colors are a result of how long the roux is cooked; white is cooked for the…
  • Source: https://www.thehealthyjournal.com/faq/what-are-the-3-types-of-roux

What are the 3 types of roux sauces? – The Healthy Journal

What are the 3 types of roux sauces? - The Healthy Journal

  • Author: thehealthyjournal.com

  • Rating: 5⭐ (189091 rating)

  • Highest Rate: 5⭐

  • Lowest Rate: 2⭐

  • Sumary: The Healthy Journal is a lifestyle website with gluten, dairy, sugar free recipes, interviews , health articles, natural remedies, food stores and vegetarian restaurants worldwide.

  • Matching Result: There are four varieties of roux: white, blond, brown, and dark brown. The different colors are a result of how long the roux is cooked; white is cooked …

  • Intro: The Healthy Journal – Gluten, Dairy, Sugar Free Recipes, Interviews and Health Articles What are the 3 types of roux sauces? There are four varieties of roux: white, blond, brown, and dark brown. The different colors are a result of how long the roux is cooked; white is cooked for…
  • Source: https://www.thehealthyjournal.com/faq/what-are-the-3-types-of-roux-sauces

Frequently Asked Questions About what are the 3 types of roux

If you have questions that need to be answered about the topic what are the 3 types of roux, then this section may help you solve it.

What are the roux’s three stages?

The roux is cooked in French cuisine to one of three stages: white, blonde, or brown (New Orleans cuisine has even more shades, including red and black). The longer the cooking time, the darker the roux.

What are the three sauces that begin with a roux?

Three of the five mother sauces of traditional French cuisine—the sauce Espagnole, the béchamel sauce, and the velouté sauce—use roux.

What are the roux’s 4 stages?

There are four distinct stages of roux, from almost black with the least amount of thickening ability to white with the most thickening power.

  1. White Roux: …
  2. Blonde Roux: …
  3. Brown Roux: …
  4. Chocolate Roux:

What are the two essential components of a roux?

When fat and flour are cooked together, the fat coats the starch granules in the flour, preventing lumps from forming when the roux is combined with liquid, such as milk or stock, and resulting in a silky, uniform sauce.

What is the purpose of brown roux?

Brown roux is made by slowly cooking flour and clarified butter in the oven while stirring frequently to thicken rich brown sauces like Espagnole and Demi-glace.

What exactly is roux explic?

A roux is a mixture of flour and fat that is frequently used as a thickening agent in the preparation of stews and sauces and can also serve as the foundation for several Classical French sauces, such as Bechamel or Velouté. To make a roux, fat is melted and an equal amount of flour is stirred into the fat until the mixture is fully incorporated.

What is the ideal roux ratio?

For example, if you use 4 tablespoons of butter, you would use 4 tablespoons (or 14 cup) of flour because the ratio of flour to butter in a roux is 1:1.

When making a roux, what should you avoid using?

Adding roux to your dish? The lighter the roux, the more it will thicken. Dark roux: Is a delicious and flavorful base for gumbo and many Cajun dishes. It has a long cook time so using butter is not recommended as it will burn and ruin the flavor.

How many roux varieties are there?

There are four different kinds of roux: the traditional white roux, blonde roux, caramelized brown roux for Cajun dishes, and red roux (with tomato) for seafood dishes.

The ideal type of flour for roux?

Always use plain white flour; self-raising flour contains a raising agent and imparts a faint bicarb flavor to the finished sauce.

Is butter or oil better for roux?

If you want a dairy-heavy sauce, like milky béchamel, butter is usually the preferred option (and is also the more common fat in most French roux), whereas oil is frequently preferred in Creole and Cajun cooking. However, butter is more than just a fat.

What kind of oil is best for roux?

If you prefer using animal fats, like we do, you can choose from lard or bacon grease. Butter is only good for a very light colored roux; it is not advised for the dark colored one that is needed for gumbo. The best types of oil would be peanut, vegetable, or canola; avoid using olive oil.

To a roux, do you add hot or cold water?

To avoid lumps when adding liquids to a roux, always add cold liquid to hot roux (or, cold roux to hot liquids). If both the roux and the liquid are hot, the mixture will clump up quickly and you’ll end up with lumps. Making roux ahead of time is the secret to perfect homemade gravy.

When creating a roux, what should you avoid doing?

You want to either cool the roux down and then add it to simmering liquid, or add cold liquid to the hot roux you just made. If you add a cold roux to a cold liquid, it won’t dissolve or thicken, and if you do the same with a hot roux to a hot liquid, it will produce a lumpy sauce.

To a roux, should you add hot or cold milk?

The large temperature difference between cold milk and a hot butter mixture can easily separate and won’t create as smooth of a sauce and smoothness is key here, so by warming the milk before adding it to the roux, your mixture will come together more easily.

Does milk go into a roux cold or warm?

If the milk is too hot, the roux won’t have enough time to properly disperse in the liquid before the mixture comes to a boil; this is what causes sauces to lump. Julia Child taught me to add hot milk to the roux when making béchamel, but I later discovered that the milk should be cold or at room temperature.

When making roux, should you use butter or oil?

Butter is the most popular fat, but you can also make roux with oil, bacon grease, or other rendered fats. To make roux, you cook equal parts flour and fat until the raw flavor of the flour cooks out and the roux has acquired the desired color.

Share this post